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The Master of Applied Innovation and Entrepreneurship curriculum consists of 36 units, involving both coursework and a project. Initially, the program will be available on a part-time basis.

Program structure

The 36-unit Master of Applied Innovation and Entrepreneurship program consists of 30 units of coursework and a 6 unit project.

The Graduate Diploma is a 24-unit program of which at least 18 units are core courses and 6 units are electives.

The Graduate Certificate is a 12-unit program, comprising 6 units which are core, and 6 units of electives.

There is also an option for a 48-unit Master of Applied Innovation and Entrepreneurship program with a compulsory 12 unit research project in Entrepreneurship. This track is for International students and people who choose to move to a PhD program after the Master’s program.

Please note that students can select a 6 or 12 unit project. The project type selected will determine whether 1 or 3 electives are required.

Assessment

Standard coursework, project work and assignments

Total units required for this masters program – 36 units

6 Core Courses and a project – 30 credits

Marketing Technology And Innovation (3 Units)

This course helps students to develop an understanding of the forces driving competition and demand in markets or technology-intensive products and services. The content covers product management decisions (design, channels/logistics, pricing/promotions etc.) across stages of product life cycles affecting innovative and/or technology products. Students enhance skills in analysing competitive trends, identifying threats and opportunities, designing new products, and/or marketing strategies. Students develop a marketing strategy and perform a market analysis to define potential markets for an innovation and/or a technology.

Entrepreneurship And Innovation (3 Units)

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise and entrepreneurship and furthers the understanding of the role of innovation and technology and their efficient management to build and maintain a competitive edge in an entrepreneurial business. The course provides entrepreneurs and managers with a set of concepts and tools to improve the competitiveness of their venture or organisation. The course is relevant to entrepreneurs and professionals from all backgrounds that wish to learn about and apply principles and strategies to achieve higher levels of innovation.

Project And Innovation Finance And Accounting (3 Units)

Engineers, scientists, technologists and those starting new ventures understand that a good grasp of accounting and financial management disciplines are crucial to success. This course is designed to take such professionals through the essential knowledge and skills development in areas such as: accounting concepts, understanding and analysing financial statements, book keeping, the accounting cycle, cash flow, company accounting, budgeting and planning, an introduction to management accounting. This course introduces financial modelling, analysis of project proposals and cost optimisation. Major topics include the time value of money and capital budgeting processes, depreciation, capitalisation and valuation, sensitivity analysis, value management, earned value, life cycle costing. Application of projects and innovative new ventures.

Opportunity Assessment (3 Units)

This course is aimed at anyone who needs to assess possible business opportunities including possible project management opportunities that are mainly, but not exclusively, based on an innovative technological concept. Rapid screening techniques are introduced, which will address the underlying business concept, the base technology, benefits to customers, potential markets, financial feasibility, risk and benefits to the organisation and the next steps to be taken. Opportunity screening protocols will be treated in depth and a comprehensive venture – screening guide will be developed during the course. The course will also provide an introduction to the business planning process for a new enterprise.

Creativity and Innovation (3 Units)

This course explores individual and group creativity; barriers to creativity and approaches for overcoming these; methods for generating or recognising ideas; alternatives or possibilities to solve commercial or operational problems; as well as turning creativity into innovation that benefits the customer and the business venture. Students will also examine options for bringing creativity and innovation into the organisation and building an environment to support these activities and create creative scenarios for the future of organisations.

Managing Strategy And Growth (3 Units)

In this course we study the relationship between new venture growth and strategy. It provides students with an overview of the dynamics involved in growing a new venture including the many aspects that must be considered to ensure the business operates smoothly and meets the needs of its customers while keeping a focus on strategy. Intellectual Capital and the Resource Based View are the two main frameworks utilised to examine the dynamic relationships. The course adds to the information gained in other courses such as Opportunity Assessment, Marketing and Financial Management and presents students with an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to complete another aspect of a comprehensive business plan.

Project In Entrepreneurship (6 Units)

The Masters Entrepreneurship Project offers scope for candidates to pursue their own business related research interest in three broadly defined areas, namely; the new enterprise creation process, the strategic management of innovation relevant to established or growth oriented SMEs and other organisations, a more theoretical project to allow a candidate to pursue study into a specific topic or issue relevant to entrepreneurship and innovation. A candidate will present their proposed topic to the Coordinator for approval prior to commencement of the work. The project will therefore allow a candidate to pursue research into an area or topic related to entrepreneurship. Previous candidates have used the Project as a vehicle for undertaking business research that leads to a report documenting the means by which an established organisation may improve its performance should it implement strategies designed to raise the level of innovation through entrepreneurial management.

Reading And Writing Entrepreneurship Research (3 Units)

ENTREP 7049OL Reading and Writing Entrepreneurship Research

Advanced Venture Modelling and Communication (3 Units)

ENTREP 7048OL Advanced Venture Modelling and Communication

Electives

Applied Project Management 1 (3 Units)

This course introduces the context, rationale, strategy and tactics of project management from the perspectives of key stakeholders. Project phases are identified and examined. The importance of project planning and control is emphasised. Various models of project management are covered including the Project Management Body of Knowledge, PRINCE 2 and IPMA, as are the internationally recognised areas of knowledge, the iterative processes and the core skills required by successful project managers. Participants will be expected to relate the application of PMBOK directly to projects from their experience and as a course assignment will be able to apply what they have learnt to an actual work place project.

Managing Project And Systemic Risks (3 Units)

The course addresses decision and risk analysis, methods for structuring and modelling decision problems, and application of methods to a variety of problems that involve risk and uncertainty related to the commercialisation of new technologies and development of projects. Students apply risk analysis tools to a commercialisation assessment problem or a project development.

Leadership Of Organisations (3 Units)

This course aims to provide students with a good understanding of the leadership and management theory with a particular emphasis on the implications of transformational leadership and the application of emotional and social capabilities to achieving desired outcomes in modern companies. The elective combines experiential learning with theory and practical applications. At the end of the course students should be aware of current leadership and management theories, have an understanding of the differences in personality types and their own leadership style, and have a basic knowledge of people management practices to align team performance with project outcomes within organisations with a range of different goals, values and stakeholders. Content will include: bases of authority, models of leadership, transformational leadership, emotional intelligence, values based leadership, Situational Leadership, gender and cultural perceptions of leadership.

Enterprise Transformation (3 Units)

Note: This not an elective in the Grad Cert. Only elective in Grad Dip and Masters.

This is a capstone course in the Master of Project Management and focuses on the use of project management by corporations to achieve corporate goals. Topics covered include identification of corporate strategy, managing by process, scenarios and systems engineering principles, enterprise architecture, process redesign, project directors skills, capability maturity, project, portfolio and program management and the role of values in a project producing organisation. A major assignment based on the application of these areas to an organisation, is used.

Portfolios And Programs Management (3 Units)

Note: This not an elective in the Grad Cert. Only elective in Grad Dip and Masters.

The role of portfolios and programs in managing projects especially how portfolios and programs relate to project management and corporate strategy. The management processes and strategies relevant to portfolios and programs and the benefits gained. Aspects of developing a portfolio of maturing assets and opportunities, and balancing the portfolio. Duties and competencies of portfolios and programs managers.

Social Entrepreneurship (3 Units)

This course provides students with a knowledge and understanding of the principles of social entrepreneurship. Case studies are presented and students then apply this knowledge to an individual topic that forms the basis of their reports. This course is relevant to entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs that have a social, environmental or non profit focus.

Innovation And Corporate Venturing (3 Units)

This course examines the innovation and entrepreneurial skills required to identify and develop business and project opportunities within the corporate context. These include understanding the fundamentals of innovation and entrepreneurship and how these relate to and influence corporate strategy. The corporation, in turn, influences economies, industry and competitive environments. The course considers the, role of foresight and how different innovation and entrepreneurship processes can be facilitated within a corporate setting. Skills are developed in competitive analysis, new venture and project strategy, feasibility analysis and accessing finance, legal and other necessary support within the confines of competing business interests. The objectives are to build participant understanding and skills equipping them to create innovative new ventures and projects that add significant new value for the corporation, industry and community.

Business And Contract Legal Studies (3 Units)

Note: This not an elective in the Grad Cert. Only elective in Grad Dip and Masters.

This course includes a description of the common law process, theoretical basis of contracts; Contract formation including the requirements for intention on the part of the contracting parties, agreement, formalities and consideration, contractual capacity, consent and legality. Operation of contracts including rules for interpretation of written documents; Discharge of contracts by performance; express agreement, frustration, election after breach; Remedies for breach of contract; Rules for assessment of the measure of damages; Variation of existing contracts including a discussion of the principles of promissory estoppel; Introduction to the law of torts; Historical development of the law relating to negligence; Extension of the law of negligence into situations involving negligent misstatement; The evolution of the concept of proximity; Standard of care, remoteness of damage and defences to actions for negligence; Actions for negligence based on a duty of care arising out of a contract. The statutory regulation of transactions for the provision of goods and services; Dispute resolution including commercial arbitration, mediation and expert determination; Discussion of how the matters discussed in the course impact on the procurement procedures; Arbitration with the course participants assuming the roles of litigants, counsel, witnesses and the arbitrator; Implications for contract administration.

Please note that students can select a 6 or 12 unit project. The project type selected will determine whether 1 or 3 electives are required.

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View our Online Course Offerings Timetable 2016.


Learn about the online project management curriculum

The courses include a strong focus on processes and tools required to achieve outcomes and industry-specific case studies, class discussions and assignments based on real projects, including the participant’s own workplace projects. Guiding students through leading-edge project management concepts, this program places a strong emphasis on holistic and systems-based project management methods, combined with the practical application of concepts, techniques and tools.

The University of Adelaide has designed the first course in the Master of Applied Project Management (Project Systems) to be 100% aligned with the PMI® exam, helping you to prepare to obtain your PMP certification.

The University of Adelaide is a Registered Education Provider (REP) for the Project Management Institute (PMI®). An REP is an organisation approved by PMI® to issue Professional Development Units (PDU) for its training courses.

The Master of Applied Project Management (Project Systems) is a 12 course 36 unit program. Each term will have a duration of 10 weeks. Students will take the following courses:

Applied Project Management 1 (3 units) – CORE

This course introduces the context, rationale, strategy and tactics of project management from the perspectives of key stakeholders. Project phases are identified and examined. The importance of project planning and control is emphasised. Various models of project management are covered, including the Project Management Body of Knowledge, PRINCE 2 and IPMA, as are the internationally recognised areas of knowledge, the interative processes and the core skills required by successful project managers. Participants will be expected to relate the application of PMBOK® Guide directly to projects from their experience and as a course assignment will be able to apply what they have learnt to an actual work place project.

Leadership of Organisations (3 units) – CORE

This elective aims to provide students with a good understanding of the leadership and management theory with a particular emphasis on the implications of transformational leadership and the application of emotional and social capabilities to achieving desired outcomes in modern companies. The elective combines experiential learning with theory and practical applications. At the end of the course students should be aware of current leadership and management theories, have an understanding of the differences in personality types and their own leadership style and have a basic knowledge of people management practices to align team performance with project outcomes within organisations with a range of different goals, values and stakeholders. Content will include bases of authority, models of leadership, transformational leadership, emotional intelligence, values-based leadership, situational leadership, gender and cultural perceptions of leadership.

Managing Project and Systemic Risks (3 units) – CORE

The course addresses decision and risk analysis, methods for structuring and modelling decision problems and application of methods to a variety of problems that involve risk and uncertainty related to the commercialisation of new technologies and development of projects. Students apply risk analysis tools to a commercialisation assessment problem or a project development.

Project and Innovation Finance and Accounting (3 units) – CORE

Engineers, scientists, technologists and those starting new ventures understand that a good grasp of accounting and financial management disciplines are crucial to success. This course is designed to take such professionals through the essential knowledge and skills development in areas such as: accounting concepts, understanding and analysing financial statements, book keeping, the accounting cycle, cash flow, company accounting, budgeting and planning and introduction to management accounting. This course introduces financial modelling, analysis of project proposals and cost optimisation. Major topics include the time value of money and capital budgeting processes, depreciation, capitalisation and valuation, sensitivity analysis, value management, earned value and life cycle costing. Application of projects and innovative new ventures.

Opportunity Assessment (3 units) – CORE

This course is aimed at anyone who needs to assess possible business opportunities including possible project management opportunities that are mainly, but not exclusively, based on an innovative technological concept. Rapid screening techniques are introduced, which will address the underlying business concept, the base technology, benefits to customers, potential markets, financial feasibility, risk and benefits to the organisation and the next steps to be taken. Opportunity screening protocols will be treated in depth and a comprehensive venture – screening guide will be developed during the course. The course will also provide an introduction to the business planning process for a new enterprise.

Creativity and Innovation (3 units) – CORE

This course explores individual and group creativity; barriers to creativity and approaches for overcoming these; methods for generating or recognising ideas; alternatives or possibilities to solve commercial or operational problems; as well as turning creativity into innovation that benefits the customer and the business venture. Students will also examine options for bringing creativity and innovation into the organisation and building an environment to support these activities and create creative scenarios for the future of organisations.

Business and Contract Legal Studies (3 units) – CORE

This course includes a description of the common law process and theoretical basis of contracts; contract formation including the requirements for intention on the part of the contracting parties, agreement, formalities and consideration, contractual capacity, consent and legality. Operation of contracts including rules for interpretation of written documents; Discharge of contracts by performance; express agreement, frustration, election after breach; Remedies for breach of contract; Rules for assessment of the measure of damages; Variation of existing contracts including a discussion of the principles of promissory estoppel; Introduction to the law of torts; Historical development of the law relating to negligence; Extension of the law of negligence into situations involving negligent misstatement; The evolution of the concept of proximity; Standard of care, remoteness of damage and defences to actions for negligence; Actions for negligence based on a duty of care arising out of a contract. The statutory regulation of transactions for the provision of goods and services; Dispute resolution including commercial arbitration, mediation and expert determination; Discussion of how the matters discussed in the course impact on the procurement procedures; Arbitration with the course participants assuming the roles of litigants, counsel, witnesses and the arbitrator; Implications for contract administration.

Project Management Controls (3 units) – CORE

This course is the intermediate core course between Applied Project Management 1 and Enterprise Transformation in the Master of Project Management. It covers the management techniques required to achieve outcomes on projects in each of the areas of scope, time, cost, quality, procurement, human resources and communication. Further development of scenarios and the use of project management in various industries, including information technology, defence, construction, roll-out of government services, social, finance, medical, research and commercialisation occurs.

Enterprise Transformation (3 units) – CORE

This is a capstone course in the Master of Project Management and focuses on the use of project management by corporations to achieve corporate goals. Topics covered include: identification of corporate strategy; managing by process; scenarios and systems engineering principles; enterprise architecture; process redesign; project directors skills; capability maturity; project, portfolio and program management and the role of values in a project-producing organisation. A major assignment based on the application of these areas to an organisation is used.

Complex Project Management 1 (3 units) – CORE

The objectives of this course are to focus on system of systems projects, that is, those which integrate autonomous and independent projects, which are normally linked nodes. Such projects have high degrees of emergence, have high internal and external system complexity and usually have large life cycle costs. Such projects require the project team to learn during the life of the project in order to clarify what is required and consequently how to deliver it. Examples of such projects include complex defence projects which include multiple powerful stakeholders such as multi-nationals; managing climate change, terrorism and disaster relief are further examples.

Content includes a review of general systems theory and a review of the key areas supporting systems engineering and then focuses on system of systems topics of incremental commitment project delivery methods, developing project architecture, developing project requirements and understanding and managing people differently to traditional projects by recognising culture and values, encouraging dissent, assisting sensemaking and supporting developing patterns of work behaviour rather than a top-down specification of duties.

Some attention is given to soft systems including Checkland’s Soft Systems Methodology of rich pictures, root definition and CATWOE; systems dynamics, Senge’s systems thinking and total systems intervention are discussed.

Portfolios and Programs Management (3 units) – CORE

This course specifically addresses how organisations achieve strategic goals and objectives through Project Portfolio and Programs of multiple projects. Specifically this will address how an organization strategically selects, initiates, prioritises and controls initiatives through Portfolio Alignment, Monitoring and Control.

The course will also consider how an organisation can benefit from delivering multiple projects in a Program environment including governing, controlling and supporting the organisation’s strategy through Program Management.

The management processes and strategies relevant to portfolios and programs and the benefits gained are examined.

Aspects of developing a portfolio of maturing assets and opportunities, and balancing the portfolio, are examined. Duties and competencies of portfolios and programs managers are addressed. Skills are developed in use of the tools and techniques of portfolios and projects.

Systems Fundamentals (3 units) – CORE

The content of the course focuses on an exploration of complex systems and the key aspects of these and the benefits in them for managing complex projects appropriately. There is recognition of reductionist thinking and its benefits and disadvantages; General Systems theory is discussed; Checkland’s soft system methodology and Senge’s systems dynamics provide a context and specific skills. Major topics addressed include Network of essentially parallel systems; Emergence ; Self-organisation; Inhabiting the complexity space between order and chaos; Power laws and Paretian behaviour; Scale free and fractal behaviour; Self-organised criticality; Tiny initiating events; Prigogine’s dissipating structures theory; Kauffman’s fitness landscape; the Environment driving system scope and structure; Dynamism; Attractor cages and Phase space; Path history; Systemic and cascading risk and black swan events; Sense making and common meaning; Identifying leverage points; Systems intelligence.

Research in Project Management (12 units)

PROJMGNT 7009OL Research in Project Management

Project Management Research Project (6 units)

PROJMGNT 7058OL Project Management Research Project (6 units)

Research Methodology (3 units)

COMMERCE 7037OL Research Methods

Marketing Technology and Innovation (3 units) – ELECTIVE

Develops an understanding of the forces driving competition and demand in markets for technology-intensive products and services. Covers product management decisions (design, channels/logistics, pricing/promotions, etc.) across stages of product life cycles affecting innovative and/or technology products. Enhances skills in analysing competitive trends, identifying threats and opportunities, designing new products and/or marketing strategies. Students develop a marketing strategy and perform a market analysis to define potential markets for an innovation and/or a technology.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 units) – ELECTIVE

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise and entrepreneurship and furthers the understanding of the role of innovation and technology and their efficient management to build and maintain a competitive edge in an entrepreneurial business. The course provides entrepreneurs and managers with a set of concepts and tools to improve the competitiveness of their venture or organisation. The course is relevant to entrepreneurs and professionals from all backgrounds who wish to learn about and apply principles and strategies to achieve higher levels of innovation.

The Master of Applied Project Management (Project Systems) has two nested awards. It has two exit points for those who choose not to complete the full Master’s; the Graduate Certificate in Applied Project Management (4 courses, 12 units) and the Graduate Diploma in Applied Project Management (8 courses, 24 units).

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Learn more about the Course Outlines.

View our Online Course Offerings Timetable 2016.

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